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Livelihoods and landscapes at the threshold of change: disaster and resilience in a Chiapas coffee community

Eakin, Hallie Catherine, 1970- [autora] | Benessaiah, Karina [autora] | Barrera, Juan F [autor] | Cruz Bello, Gustavo M [autor] | Morales, H [autora].
Tipo de material: Artículo ArtículoTipo de contenido: Texto Tipo de medio: Computadora Tipo de portador: Recurso en líneaTema(s): Desastres naturales | Huracán Stan, 2005 | Cafeticultores | Medios de vida | Resiliencia ambiental | Reducción de riesgosDescriptor(es) geográficos: Siltepec (Chiapas, México) Nota de acceso: Disponible para usuarios de ECOSUR con su clave de acceso En: Regional Environmental Change. volumen 12, número 3 (2012), páginas 475-48. --ISSN: 436-3798Número de sistema: 9873Resumen:
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In 2005, torrential rains associated with Hurricane Stan devastated farm systems in southern Mexico. We present a case study on the impacts of and responses to Hurricane Stan by coffee households in three communities in the highlands of Chiapas, Mexico, with the objective of illuminating the linkages between household vulnerability and resilience. We analyze data from 64 household surveys in a cluster analysis to link household impacts experienced to post-Stan adaptive responses and relate these results with landscape-level land-cover changes. The degree of livelihood change was most significant for land-constrained households whose specialization in coffee led to high exposure and sensitivity to Stan and little adaptive capacity. Across the sample, the role of coffee in livelihood strategies declined, as households sought land to secure subsistence needs and diversified economically after Stan. Nevertheless, livelihoods and landscape outcomes were not closely coupled, at least at the temporal and spatial scale of our analysis: We found no evidence of land-use change associated with farmers' coping strategies. While households held strong attitudes regarding effective resource management for risk reduction, this knowledge does not necessarily translate into capacities to manage resilience at broader scales. We argue that policy interventions are needed to help materialize local strategies and knowledge on risk management, not only to allow individual survival but also to enhance resilience at local, community and landscape scales.

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Disponible para usuarios de ECOSUR con su clave de acceso

In 2005, torrential rains associated with Hurricane Stan devastated farm systems in southern Mexico. We present a case study on the impacts of and responses to Hurricane Stan by coffee households in three communities in the highlands of Chiapas, Mexico, with the objective of illuminating the linkages between household vulnerability and resilience. We analyze data from 64 household surveys in a cluster analysis to link household impacts experienced to post-Stan adaptive responses and relate these results with landscape-level land-cover changes. The degree of livelihood change was most significant for land-constrained households whose specialization in coffee led to high exposure and sensitivity to Stan and little adaptive capacity. Across the sample, the role of coffee in livelihood strategies declined, as households sought land to secure subsistence needs and diversified economically after Stan. Nevertheless, livelihoods and landscape outcomes were not closely coupled, at least at the temporal and spatial scale of our analysis: We found no evidence of land-use change associated with farmers' coping strategies. While households held strong attitudes regarding effective resource management for risk reduction, this knowledge does not necessarily translate into capacities to manage resilience at broader scales. We argue that policy interventions are needed to help materialize local strategies and knowledge on risk management, not only to allow individual survival but also to enhance resilience at local, community and landscape scales. eng

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