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Fitness of mass-reared males of Anastrepha obliqua (Diptera: Tephritidae) resulting from mating competition tests in field cages

Hernández Ortiz, Emilio | Liedo Fernández, Pablo [autor/a] | Toledo, Jorge [autor/a] | Montoya Gerardo, Pablo Jesús [autor/a] | Perales Rivera, Hugo Rafael [autor/a] | Ruiz Montoya, Lorena, 1964- [autor/a].
Tipo de material: Artículo
 en línea Artículo en línea Tema(s): Anastrepha obliqua | Moscas de la fruta | Frecuencia de apareamiento | Peso corporal | LongevidadTema(s) en inglés: Anastrepha obliqua | Fruit flies | Mating frequency | Body weight | LongevityNota de acceso: Disponible para usuarios de ECOSUR con su clave de acceso En: Journal of Economic Entomology. volumen 110, número 6 (December 2017), páginas 2325-2333. --ISSN: 1938-291XNúmero de sistema: 58604Resumen:
Inglés

The sterile insect technique uses males that have been mass-reared in a controlled environment. The insects, once released in the field, must compete to mate. However, the mass-rearing condition supposes a loss of fitness that will be noticeable by wild females. To compare the fitness of wild males and mass-reared males, three competition settings were established. In setting 1, wild males, mass-reared males and wild females were released in field cages. In setting 2, wild females and wild males were released without competition, and in setting 3, mass-reared males and mass-reared females were also released without competition. Male fitness was based on their mating success, fecundity, weight and longevity. The fitness of the females was measured based on weight and several demographic parameters. The highest percentage of mating was between wild males and wild females between 0800 and 0900 h in the competition condition, while the mass-reared males started one hour later. The successful wild males weighed more and showed longer mating times, greater longevity and a higher number of matings than the mass-reared males. Although the mass-reared males showed the lowest percentage of matings, their fecundity when mating with wild females indicated a high fitness. Since the survival and fecundity of wild females that mated with mass-reared males decreased to become similar to those of mass-reared females that mated with mass-reared males, females seem to be influenced by the type of male (wild or mass-reared).

Recurso en línea: https://academic.oup.com/jee/article/110/6/2325/4440525
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The sterile insect technique uses males that have been mass-reared in a controlled environment. The insects, once released in the field, must compete to mate. However, the mass-rearing condition supposes a loss of fitness that will be noticeable by wild females. To compare the fitness of wild males and mass-reared males, three competition settings were established. In setting 1, wild males, mass-reared males and wild females were released in field cages. In setting 2, wild females and wild males were released without competition, and in setting 3, mass-reared males and mass-reared females were also released without competition. Male fitness was based on their mating success, fecundity, weight and longevity. The fitness of the females was measured based on weight and several demographic parameters. The highest percentage of mating was between wild males and wild females between 0800 and 0900 h in the competition condition, while the mass-reared males started one hour later. The successful wild males weighed more and showed longer mating times, greater longevity and a higher number of matings than the mass-reared males. Although the mass-reared males showed the lowest percentage of matings, their fecundity when mating with wild females indicated a high fitness. Since the survival and fecundity of wild females that mated with mass-reared males decreased to become similar to those of mass-reared females that mated with mass-reared males, females seem to be influenced by the type of male (wild or mass-reared). eng

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