Vista normal Vista MARC

Social representations and practices towards Triatomines and chagas disease in Calakmul, México

Valdez Tah, Alba Rocío | Huicochea Gómez, Laura [autor/a] | Ortega Canto, Judith Elena [autor/a] | Nazar Beutelspacher, Austreberta, 1960- [autor/a] | Ramsey Willoquet, Janine M [autor/a].
Tipo de material: Artículo
 en línea Artículo en línea Tema(s): Triatoma dimidiata | Trypanosoma cruzi | Hábitat (Ecología) | Evaluación del paisaje | Conocimiento ecológico tradicional | Control de plagasTema(s) en inglés: Triatoma dimidiata | Trypanosoma cruzi | Habitat (Ecology) | Landscape assessment | Traditional ecological knowledge | Pest controlDescriptor(es) geográficos: Zoh-Laguna (Álvaro Obregón), Calakmul (Campeche, México) Nota de acceso: Acceso en línea sin restricciones En: Plos One. volumen 10, número 7, e0132830 (July 2015), páginas 1-28. --ISSN: 1932-6203Número de sistema: 55441Resumen:
Inglés

Vector-borne transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi (VBTTc) is dependent on the concomitant interaction between biological and environmental hazard over the entire landscape, and human vulnerability. Representations and practices of health-disease-care-seeking and territorial appropriation and use were analyzed for VBTTc in a qualitative ethnographic study in the Zoh-Laguna landscape, Campeche, Mexico. In-depth interviews and participatory observation explored representations and practices regarding ethno-ecological knowledge related to vector-transmission, health-disease-care-seeking, and land use processes. The population has a broad knowledge of biting insects, which they believe are all most abundant in the rainy season; the community´s proximity to natural areas is perceived as a barrier to control their abundance. Triatomines are mostly recognized by men, who have detailed knowledge regarding their occurrence and association with mammals in non-domestic fragments, where they report being bitten. Women emphasize the dermal consequences of triatomine bites, but have little knowledge about the disease. Triatomine bites and the chinchoma are "normalized" events which are treated using home remedies, if at all. The neglected condition of Chagas disease in Mexican public health policies, livelihoods which are dependent on primary production, and gender-related knowledge (or lack thereof) are structural circumstances which influence the environment and inhabitants´ living conditions; in turn, these trigger triatomine-human contact. The most important landscape practices producing vulnerability are the activities and mobility within and between landscape fragments causing greater exposure of inhabitants primarily in the dry season.

A landscape approach to understanding vulnerability components of VBTTc from health-disease-care-seeking perspectives and based on territorial appropriation and use, is essential where there is continuous movement of vectors between and within all habitats. An understanding of the structural factors which motivate the population´s perceptions, beliefs, and practices and which create and maintain vulnerability is essential to develop culturally relevant and sustainable community-based VBTTc prevention and control.

Recurso en línea: http://www.plosone.org/article/fetchObject.action?uri=info:doi/10.1371/journal.pone.0132830&representation=PDF
Etiquetas de esta biblioteca: No hay etiquetas de esta biblioteca para este título. Ingresar para agregar etiquetas.
Star ratings
    Valoración media: 0.0 (0 votos)
Existencias
Tipo de ítem Biblioteca actual Colección Signatura Estado Fecha de vencimiento Código de barras
Artículos Biblioteca Electrónica
Recursos en línea (RE)
ECOSUR Recurso digital ECO400554412317

Acceso en línea sin restricciones

Vector-borne transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi (VBTTc) is dependent on the concomitant interaction between biological and environmental hazard over the entire landscape, and human vulnerability. Representations and practices of health-disease-care-seeking and territorial appropriation and use were analyzed for VBTTc in a qualitative ethnographic study in the Zoh-Laguna landscape, Campeche, Mexico. In-depth interviews and participatory observation explored representations and practices regarding ethno-ecological knowledge related to vector-transmission, health-disease-care-seeking, and land use processes. The population has a broad knowledge of biting insects, which they believe are all most abundant in the rainy season; the community´s proximity to natural areas is perceived as a barrier to control their abundance. Triatomines are mostly recognized by men, who have detailed knowledge regarding their occurrence and association with mammals in non-domestic fragments, where they report being bitten. Women emphasize the dermal consequences of triatomine bites, but have little knowledge about the disease. Triatomine bites and the chinchoma are "normalized" events which are treated using home remedies, if at all. The neglected condition of Chagas disease in Mexican public health policies, livelihoods which are dependent on primary production, and gender-related knowledge (or lack thereof) are structural circumstances which influence the environment and inhabitants´ living conditions; in turn, these trigger triatomine-human contact. The most important landscape practices producing vulnerability are the activities and mobility within and between landscape fragments causing greater exposure of inhabitants primarily in the dry season. eng

A landscape approach to understanding vulnerability components of VBTTc from health-disease-care-seeking perspectives and based on territorial appropriation and use, is essential where there is continuous movement of vectors between and within all habitats. An understanding of the structural factors which motivate the population´s perceptions, beliefs, and practices and which create and maintain vulnerability is essential to develop culturally relevant and sustainable community-based VBTTc prevention and control. eng

Disponible en línea

Adobe Acrobat profesional 6.0 o superior

Con tecnología Koha